A Micro Odyssey: The relationship between science and art

2022-09-21 – Feature

Bacteria, Science, Earth

The trinomial photography, planets and bacteria and the binomials heaven and earth, finite and infinite, known and unknown, give shape to the emotions and reflections that Marco Castelli’s work wants to convey and inspire. Opposites vie for our moods and our feelings: dark and light, fantasy and reality, truth and abstraction.

Most of the photographs of microbes and bacteria have a scientific nature, adapted to detect and to emphasize the unique geometries that these are able to form. This time, however, the interest is not to show the invisible or what is hardly visible to the naked eye, but to use the natural shapes of bacterial colonies to enlarge and project them into another dimension, reversing all logic and ratio between big and small, thus loading the planets, the universe and all the work of symbolic values. This gives them charm and mystery, makes them sublime images and ironic too (planets names directly refer to the sampled surfaces), which in their relationship with science recall the themes, the spirit and the philosophy of a lot of artistic production from the last century.

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