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Photography & Words By Daniele D’ingeo

“On October 9th, 2016, the day the world woke up to the news that Donald Trump had become one of the most high powered men on earth. London was greyer than usual that day. With Brexit results still fresh on the mind of Londoners, the United States presidential elections were somehow a decisive event in determining the fate of the free world as we’d known it up until then. The death of the American dream appeared as a sharp blow to the values that make London one of the most liberal cities in the world.
Almost two years into this vivid nightmare, it was no surprise that as soon as word came in that Donald Trump was going to visit the land of the Thames, ideas of a protest in the capital began rising everywhere on social media and among political groups.
Trump’s (unshocking) live-action version of American Horror Story – including attacks to bipartisanship as well as the FBI, rulings in favour of transphobia and racism, disastrous immigration and foreign policy, starring a brilliant Twitter anthology – urged nearly 250,000 people to take the streets of London on July 13th, in one of the most intersectional protests the city has ever seen.
Following a giant inflatable baby resembling the POTUS, you could spot in fact labour activists, angry elder people, disabled, anarchists, as well as LGBTQ+ groups, migrants support charities and pro-Palestine representatives, sixth form kids in uniforms and builders in uniforms. While expressing solidarity to the American siblings, London citizens stood to remind the higher powers of the importance of dissent and the choice in favour of the right side of history. The march and the chants went on all day, with the presence of a great variety of floats and creative signs, from the more British humorous to less polite ones. As the parade terminates in Trafalgar Square, political figures take the stage and give speeches, while all around the anger leaves space to the warmth of the music, the cheers and the hugs. Another day slowly ends while London is still open, London is still accepting and inclusive and diverse, and most of all London is here and is not going anywhere.”

Anti Trump Protests In London

Anti Trump Protests In London